Small, family run flower farm in the heart of California.

Loomis Flower Farm Shop

Archive for April, 2017

Homemade Garlic Deer Repellent

Homemade Deer Repellent

Making Homemade Deer and Rabbit Repellent

Last year I had some plants decimated by deer, and wanted to be proactive and get ahead of the curve.  So I set out to make homemade deer repellent with common household items.  Here is a list of what you will need:
  1.  Peeled garlic cloves
  2. Cayenne Pepper
  3. Eggs
  4. Water
  5. Liquid soap
  6. Food Processor
  7. Boiling Water
  8. Container
So, put the garlic and cayenne pepper in the food processor to start your homemade deer repellent project.  While you are doing this, boil a few cups of water, and prepare your container.  I used an old water jug from the kids soccer days.  Once the garlic and pepper is ground to a pulp for your repellent, put it and eggs (I used 3) into your container.  Whip up the eggs so the yolks break, and pour in the hot water into your repellent base.  Stir the mixture well, and put about 5 drops of liquid soap into the mix.  Cover the container, and shake it to mix.  Let this sit for a few days.   To use your newly made deer repellent, open your container, and be prepared for the stench, and use cheesecloth or a paint filter to fill up a spray bottle about a quarter of the way.  This is highly concentrated, and you can make it go a long way if you dilute it.  Fill the rest of your sprayer with water and shake.  Apply this to your plants, and repel all your furry enemies.  This concoction is also good for: rabbit repellent and grasshopper repellent. Be sure and reapply after the rain!
Dahlia Cuttings from a Tuber

Propagating Dahlias

Cuttings and Dividing Tubers: Dahlia Propagation

Starting to propagate my dahlias this week, and using a couple of techniques.  In this article i will outline how I am taking tuber cuttings to multiply my stock.  First off, at the beginning of my season, i put my tubers into containers indoors, and cover them about half-way with potting soil so i can catch all the action.  Depending on the type, and the warmth, it usually takes a few weeks before the eyes start sprouting, and another one or two before i can start propagating the dahlias.  Below is an overview of the technique:
  1.  Once the tuber has a number of sprouts, I select ones that are 3 or 4 inches in height for my cuttings.
    Dahlia Propagation from shoots

    Tuber with multiple shoots for taking cuttings for propagation

    2.  Once I have selected a Dahlia shoot with two sets of leaves, I then use a sharp instrument (Exacto Knife), to take a cutting.  Note: You want to get a bit of the dahlia tuber at the base to insure the best chances for rooting.
    Dahlia Cuttings from a Tuber

    Take a bit of the Dahlia Tuber with the cutting

    3.  I take off the bottom set of leaves once I have the cutting.
    Dahlia Flower Multiply

    Dahlia cutting with a bit of tuber and lower leaves removed

    4.  This step is optional, but if you have rooting hormone, it can aid in getting the dahlia cutting to root more quickly.
    Dahlia rooting hormone

    Dip the Dahlia cutting in rooting hormone for improved success rates

    5.  Finally, take your cutting and place it in a mix of soil and vermiculite.  The loose soil will give roots free reign, and encourage growth.  Note: I also apply bottom heat and cover the cuttings with plastic to create a complete propagation environment.
    Growing dahlia cuttings

    The propagated cutting ready to grow.

    In about two weeks or so, the baby Dahlias will root.  You can check by gently tugging on the cutting.  
Skip to toolbar