Small, family run flower farm in the heart of California.

Loomis Flower Farm Shop

Archive for May, 2017

Changing the color of a hydrangea

Changing Hydrangea Color

How to change the color of your Hydrangea plant

Two years ago we propagated our favorite flower, the Hydrangea.  We wanted to create a variety of bloom colors for our Hydrangea loving customers, and to grab attention at the farmers market.  Well, it worked.  How did we do it? So, unlike most flowers, the lacecap and mophead hydrangeas can changes colors.  Fortunately for us, it is as easy as changing the soil pH.  Hydrangeas are the litmus test in the flower world.  Below are the pH ranges, and resulting colors: Acid Soil (pH less than 6.0)           Blue or Purple-Blue Flowers, Between Alkaline and Acidic (pH between 6 and 7)    Purple of Bluish Pink Flowers, Alkaline Soil (pH greater than 7)    Pink and Red Flowers How can you change the pH?  You can get a pH soil test kit to be exact, but that is not me 😉  I had pink, and wanted blue, so I wanted to lower the pH to create a more acidic environment.  To do this, I added aluminum sulfate (you could also use garden sulfur).  I sprinkled it around my hydrangea beauties, scratched it into the soil, and waited for a big rain.  To raise pH, you can use ground lime.  Use the same technique.  Good luck on changing your Hydrangea color!
Deer and rabbit deterrent

Deer and Rabbit Deterrent: The Invisible Fence

Keeping Deer and Rabbit Out of The Garden

Ok, I know, I know, another post on keeping my garden safe from deer and rabbit.  We live on a very open property in the Sierra Nevada Foothills, and there are quite a few deer families and jack rabbits that roam our property.  I did not want to clog up our view with added fencing, but wanted to make sure I kept the furry critters away from my dahlias and other flowers this year.  In my first post, Homemade Garlic Deer and Rabbit Repellent, I talk about protection for my garden using a garlic, cayenne pepper and egg spray.  This works like a charm, but I wanted to add an additional deer and rabbit fencing as an outer layer of protection.   I came up with an idea to combine fishing line and randomly placed shiny mylar ribbon to create an invisible fence.
Deer repellent

Fishing line and mylar for invisible deer fencing

I bought some wooden stakes at the Home Depot and placed a few screws into the wood at 1′ and 4′.  I put several of the stakes on the perimeter of my lower field to enclose the planting area.  This was the start of my deer fence.  I then took the monofilament fishing line and ran it from stake to stake, looping it around the screws as I walked.
Natural Deer Repellent

Invisible fencing for deer and rabbits

Then, at about 8′ intervals, I tied the mylar strips onto the fishing line.   If you can’t find mylar, just use tinsel, or aluminum foil.  The shiny strips move in the breeze and reflect light at night, and the cautious deer/rabbits avoid the area.  Since placing the deer fence, I have yet to see any deer tracks  in my garden.  Hope this helps!!
Skip to toolbar