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lavender for landscaping

Posts Tagged ‘lavender for landscaping’

trimming and pruning lavender

How to Prune Your Lavender

Pruning Your Lavender Bush to Ignite Growth

Pruning your lavender is critical to plant health and the longevity of the plant. When proper care is applied to your plants, lavender can last upwards of 20 years! Pruning is required, and there is definitely a technique you must follow. Without this annual care, your lavender will grow long and lanky, and typically split. Here are the steps:

Steps for Pruning Lavender Varieties

  1. Look for the woody growth. Old growth turns brown and woody, and this is your key reference point for the pruning. Typically, plants in year two of growth will have this established growth.
  2. Prune the soft growth. Measure up about 3 inches from the woody growth you have identified on your lavender, and this soft growth area will be your target pruning point.
  3. Get the shape right. The result of pruning your lavender should be a dome or mound looking bush.
  4. Deadhead during growing season. For certain varieties, a quick deadhead prune can urge a second flowering and bloom.

How Not To Prune Your Lavender

Pruning your lavender is quite simple once you know the technique. But there are certain things you should not do.

Don’t cut into the woody stems at the heart of your plant. This old growth grows slow, and may not grow new stems at all.

Don’t prune in fall. New growth will die quickly in the cold of Fall and Winter, and stress your lavender plants. Finish up pruning by end of August.

Don’t take off too much. A good rule of thumb is to only remove the top 1/3rd of the plant. Too much more and you risk the health of your lavender.

A quick guide for you to keep your plants healthy, and enjoy the bloom season after season.

How to plant and grow lavender

Lavender: How to Choose the Right Variety

We are excited to be adding a lavender field this year with a couple hundred plants :). We did quite a bit of research before planting, and wanted to share some tips.and basic info on how to pick the right variety. It really comes down to how you want to use or grow the lavender plant. We chose Grosso and Provence to start, due to their abundant flowers and strong scent. Here is a quick list to help you choose which lavender to plant and grow:

Choosing Your Lavender Variety

Following is a list of suggested lavender varieties to consider and their uses (From the US Lavender Growers Association):

Landscaping:

  • Thumbelina Leigh – small, compact, dark violet flowers, good for containers.
  • Munstead – popular small plant with medium purple flowers, can bloom twice.
  • Hidcote – small with dark bluish purple flowers.
  • Buena Vista – medium sized plant, purple flowers that blooms continuously
  • Folgate – medium bush with light bluish flowers, one of the first to bloom in spring
  • Melissa – medium plant with light pink flowers.
  • Edelweiss – medium plant with white flowers.
  • Royal Velvet – medium plant with dark purple flowers
  • Grosso – large plant with purple flowers
  • Provence – large plant with pale purple flowers

Dried Buds (For Lavender Sachets):

  • Provence (L. x intermedia) – pale buds, some camphor scent, easy to take off stem
  • Grosso (L. x intermedia) – medium purple buds, strong camphor scent
  • Royal Velvet (L. angustifolia) – dark purple bud with sweet scent
  • Buena Vista (L. angustifolia)  – purple buds with nice lavender scent

Culinary Buds:

  • Provence (L. x intermedia) – use for meats and savories
  • Royal Velvet (L. angustifolia) – great flavor and nice dark purple bud, very nice in desserts
  • Betty’s Blue (L. angustifolia) – nice gentle lavender flavor and dark bud
  • Melissa (L. angustifolia) – wonderful flavor in desserts and teas

Crafting:

  • Grosso – nice long stems for lavender wands
  • Folgate (L. angustifolia)  – early blooming, dries dark blue/purple, great for wreaths
  • Royal Velvet (L. angustifolia) – dries dark purple, great for wreaths
  • Buena Vista (L. angustifolia) – dries dark purple, great for wreaths

Fresh Cut/You cut:

  • Folgate – early blooming lavender
  • Most angustifolias bloom earlier than lavandins
  • Buena Vista – blooms several times during the season
  • Grosso – nice long stems, easy to cut

Essential Oil:

  • Grosso (L. x intermedia) – considered the highest oil producing lavender, high camphor content
  • Royal Velvet (L. angustifolia) – sweeter, floral fragrance
  • Super (L. x intermedia) – higher oil producing lavandin with an oil fragrance similar to angustifolias
  • Maillette (L. angustifolia)  – considered the oil standard in France, one of the best angustifolia

As you can see there are too many to enjoy! Follow us for more on this topic.