Loomis Flower Farm Shop

Sharpening Garden Tools

sharpening scissors

How to Sharpen Scissors

Sharpening Scissors the Right Way

We all have them. We all tolerate them. That old pair of scissors that are so dull they bend the paper. In the garden, dull garden scissors or snips can leave wounds that can risk the health of your prize plants. If you knew how easy it was to sharpen them, you’d kick yourself. So let’s take a quick peek and the steps to sharpen scissors, and get them a sharp cutting edge. Fortunately, this technique can be used over and over to sharpen not only all your scissors, but you can sharpen garden snips, secateurs, loppers, and all your other dual blade tools with nearly the same sharpening technique.

What You’ll need:

  • Diamond Stones (I like Diamond Paddles)
  • Water or Honing Oil
  • A rag
  • Paper for sharpened cut testing
  • A screwdriver (If your scissors have a screw)
  • A permanent marker (optional)

So, there are a ton of options for actual scissor sharpening when it comes to tools. But I like simple, and diamond stone paddles are my favorite. They come in a set of 3 usually, coarse, medium and fine, and can be used not only to sharpen your scissors, but other tools in your garden shed or shop. And they are relatively cheap and take up minimal space. You can also throw them in your pocket, or garden apron, for access out in the wild.

You can use these diamond stone scissor sharpeners dry or wet, and the debate is out on which is better, but i like to use just a little water on the stone, and it seems to help sharpen and keep the stone clean as steel comes off the blade.

Scissor Sharpening Steps

If your scissors have a screw, taking them apart during the sharpening processes can be quite helpful, and you can get access to the full blade. If not you will have to open them fully to get the blades.

Sharpening the scissor blades is a two step process, and it’s important to do both sides of each scissor blade during sharpening.

How to sharpen scissor blades
Sharpen the backside of the scissors flat until you see the metal.

Take the permanent marker and run it along the front blade of the scissor. This will give you a reference and make sure you have sharpened the entire blade of the scissors.

I start with the back of the scissor blade, or the flat side. The goal here is to remove any burs (very fine), get rid of any rust that has accumulated, and make the edge totally flat. Put the scissors on the edge of a table or bench and run the stone over the scissor blade in a flat, sweeping motion. If should just need a few swipes with the fine paddle, but if there is rust or divots you may need to use the coarse paddle to remove more material. Once you have shiny metal on the blades edge, clean up with your towel and flip to the other side.

Sharpening scissors by hand
Sharpen the scissors until a clear edge is shown.

Now, let’s talk about how scissors work. They actually shear whatever you are cutting between the contact point, so the angle is very abrupt at the tup of the blade. As we sharpen the scissor blade edge, it will only be about 10 degrees off perpendicular to the bevel side. This seems counter intuitive, and most folks try and sharpen at the bevel angle. You can put the scissor blade in a vise, or hold it securely in your hand, and run the paddle from inside out across the blades edge. A few passes should put a shiny edge on your blades.

to sharpen blades of scissors
Angle your diamond paddle at about 10-20 degrees for a fine scissor edge

Try and cut the paper. A fine blade should cut with out effort, and you should be able to “push” the open blade across the paper, cutting with ease. If you can’t, rinse and repeat.

So that’s it, plain and simple. If you are like me,, you will go on a sharpening binge and sharpen all the scissors in your house garage and even your neighbor’s.

How to Sharpen Gardening Tools

Sharpening Garden Tools: What to Use

A Guide on What to Use to Sharpen Garden Shears, Pruners, Scissors, Shovels and More

Ok, we’ve all experienced it. Excited to clip those new flowers or that just ripened vegetable, you anticipate the clip, excited and ready to go for it, and with a squeeze of the hand, bleh. The stem mushes in your blades or fails to cleanly cut. Our tools enhance the pleasure of gardening, and having sharpened, clean blades can enhance the gardening experience and speed with which we glide through our rows or throughout our landscape.

So what is the best tool to sharpen a gardening tool? There are a number of garden tool sharpening tools and techniques, and below is a list:


The File

The File

The old standby: the rusty file. You can use any fine file to sharpen large blade tools like shovels, hoes, weeders, lawnmower blades and more. Note: this is will not produce the sharpest edge, but will remove rust and get rid of the dull edge on large tools.

The Rotary Tool

The Rotary Tool

Rotary tools are a great power tool for general garden sharpening and maintenance. They are relatively inexpensive and can do rough sharpening, and fine blade sharpening as well.

The Diamond Stone

The Diamond Stone

Diamond stones are a great multi-purpose sharpener for a variety of garden tools. You can use them once you have a dull blade, and have removed any rust. They have a fine and coarse side typically, and can help you hone a nice edge on any tool.

Diamond Paddle

Diamond Paddle

These paddles arelight and portable. They usually come in a set, and are portable. They are typically used for touchup after initial tool sharpening and maintenance, and are quite handy.

Angle Grinder

Angle Grinder

The angle grinder, aka “the beast”, is a great tool for quickly getting through rust and steel on large gardening tools. Shovels, hoes, lawnmower blades are no match for this tool.

So how do you use these tools? Subscribe for follow on posts on how to use them to sharpen all you garden tools.

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