Loomis Flower Farm Shop
How to Sharpen Gardening Tools

Sharpening Garden Tools: What to Use

A Guide on What to Use to Sharpen Garden Shears, Pruners, Scissors, Shovels and More

Ok, we’ve all experienced it. Excited to clip those new flowers or that just ripened vegetable, you anticipate the clip, excited and ready to go for it, and with a squeeze of the hand, bleh. The stem mushes in your blades or fails to cleanly cut. Our tools enhance the pleasure of gardening, and having sharpened, clean blades can enhance the gardening experience and speed with which we glide through our rows or throughout our landscape.

So what is the best tool to sharpen a gardening tool? There are a number of garden tool sharpening tools and techniques, and below is a list:


The File

The File

The old standby: the rusty file. You can use any fine file to sharpen large blade tools like shovels, hoes, weeders, lawnmower blades and more. Note: this is will not produce the sharpest edge, but will remove rust and get rid of the dull edge on large tools.

The Rotary Tool

The Rotary Tool

Rotary tools are a great power tool for general garden sharpening and maintenance. They are relatively inexpensive and can do rough sharpening, and fine blade sharpening as well.

The Diamond Stone

The Diamond Stone

Diamond stones are a great multi-purpose sharpener for a variety of garden tools. You can use them once you have a dull blade, and have removed any rust. They have a fine and coarse side typically, and can help you hone a nice edge on any tool.

Diamond Paddle

Diamond Paddle

These paddles arelight and portable. They usually come in a set, and are portable. They are typically used for touchup after initial tool sharpening and maintenance, and are quite handy.

Angle Grinder

Angle Grinder

The angle grinder, aka “the beast”, is a great tool for quickly getting through rust and steel on large gardening tools. Shovels, hoes, lawnmower blades are no match for this tool.

So how do you use these tools? Subscribe for follow on posts on how to use them to sharpen all you garden tools.

Garden tool maintenance

Care and Maintenance of Garden Tools

Cleaning, Sharpening and Protecting Your Gardening Tools

Ok, we are all guilty of leaving a tool or two dirty or dull. Who wants to do maintenance of garden tools when there are plants to tend? The fact is that gardening tools need love and care, just like flowers and vegetables, and if you neglect them, they will either break, or make your gardening experience less than optimal. So how often do you need to maintain those garden tools? Well, at least at the start and end of the season, but if you are like us on the farm, with heavy garden tool use, you should do it weekly or at least twice per month. So what is required? See below, and note, for convenience, at the end of the post are picture links to the Amazon products I used.

Clean Your Garden Tools

A brisk cleaning of your garden tools can be done after every outing. Leaving dirt caked on the tool and handle invites rust and decay. You can wash them with a hose and remove all dirt, but you can also wash them with a brush and some mild detergent. Dry them with a towel and let them sit in the shade to dry.

Removing Rust from Garden Tools

Rust is the devil when it comes to garden tools, and unfortunately, they live in the perfect environment for this killer: heat, water and dirt. The best way to keep rust at bay is proper storage and a daily cleaning. If rust prevails, get out some steel wool and start scrubbing. The rust should come off with a few strokes. You can also apply some light oil or WD40 to loosen the rust. Be sure and wipe your tools clean when done.

Taking Care of Garden Tool Handles

The garden is harsh on steel, but even more harsh on wood handled tools. If you are like us, you love your wood handles, and probably don’t tend to them as often as you should. If you have neglected your handles over time, fear not, a little sand paper can take away the greyness of time, and help to restore the beauty of the wood. Wooden handles require an oil like boiled linseed oil for protection. Apply the oil to the handle and let it soak up the love. All wood handles can take an application, even your Hori Hori Garden Tool. WARNING: Read the label on linseed oil rags, and do not leave them out and about when done, they generate great heat as they dry and can combust! Take it from someone who experienced this first hand.

Sharpening Garden Tools

If you have ever dug with a dull shovel, or tried to prune a tree with dull garden scissors, you know it just makes the job harder. Tools can be sharpened with a variety of methods, outlined below:

  • With a nice metal file
  • With a Dremel Tool
  • Using a grinder or grinding wheel
  • With diamond stone sharpeners
  • With a Whetstone

You don’t need something fancy, a simple sharpener with do, and there are different methods for each tool (standby for focused posts on Sharpening Your Garden Tools).

For convenience, click the picks below to buy yourself a little cleaning kit for the season (Linseed Oil, Diamond Sharpening Paddles, Steel Wool and a Dremel Sharpener):

Garden Tool Set

The Garden Tool Set: How to Choose the Best Gardening Hand Tools

Garden Tool Set Buying Guide

How do you pick the best set of gardening tools? With so much junk out there in the market, choosing a set of garden tools that will last and provide years of service out in the garden can be a daunting task. Especially if it is a gardening gift for a special person in your life. Here is a quick guide to finding quality gardening hand tool sets online, and making an informed choice when you go to buy.

How to Examine the Garden Tools Construction

  1. The Tool Handle – gardening tools need to be comfortable when working in the hot sun, and we prefer wood handled tools, hands down. If you take care of a nice set of wood handled garden tools, they will last you years. No plastic in the garden!!! Plastic handles will fade to ugly in the sun, have reduced strength and will easily crack over time or if the hand tool is left in the garden.
  2. The Tool’s Working End – stainless steel is the way to go here. Soil, sun and water are rough on a garden tool’s surface, and plain steel or cheap painted metal tool heads will rust and fade over time. A stainless tool that cleaned after being used in the garden will provide a gardener solid years of service.
  3. The Tool’s Collar – Make sure that the collar of the tool, or where the tip of the tool enters the handle is also stainless steel. Many cheap tools have flimsy, weak metal collars that either rust, or come loose over time to contribute to tool failure.
  4. Welds – Make sure the tool doesn’t have point welds. Welding points on the metal connection points should be continuous, and bigger than just a small point.

What Tools Do I Need?

As a gardener and farmer, I cannot carry all the tools in my shed: i need to have a garden tool set that provides me all the functionality I need when doing my chores in the field or garden (By the way, our gardener’s apron will provide more carrying capacity for all your garden tools ;). ). So how do I choose? Here is the perfect set of gardening tools:

  • The Hand Trowel – okay, it’s a little shovel. The garden hand trowel is the most used tool, and can provide most gardener’s a ton of use in the garden setting.
  • The Hand Cultivator – the hand rake. This tool provides great function as a garden tool, and allows for moving soil and mulch in the bed, weeding and loosening of the soil surface.
  • The Garden Scoop – The final member of our garden tool team is the garden scoop. Man we looked far and wide for this one, and use it constantly. Scoop soil, seed and fertilizer with out spilling. The member of the garden tool set is great for potting and digging large scoops, and will become a favorite.

And oh yeah, one last thing. You have to look good in the garden. Stainless and wood tools are timeless, and fun to use, and aesthetically pleasing. Don’t get caught with cheap tools :). To see our hand-picked garden tool set, click below:

Garden Scissors, Snips and Secateurs

The Garden Scissors: My New Favorite Tool

Call Them Garden Scissors, Secateurs or Snips

Ok, I have to admit, when I first used them out in our fields, I felt kind of funny. It’s like bringing a steak knife out to do cut lavender, right? Were they really up to the demands of the flower farm? We decided to evaluate a bunch of different garden scissors to find a set of these so called garden secateurs to see which ones we would put in our gardening tools section of our store. We used them to snip, cut, and prune. We ended up with a stainless steel garden snip that had a smooth action, was light and had nice small handles. Why stainless? Other garden scissors we tested (the black metal ones), rusted when they got wet, and became stiff, and did not fare well in the garden and farm environment. We love these scissors, for the following reasons:

  • They are beautiful. You have to look stylish when out and about 😉
  • The scissors are easy to hold and manipulate. When out in the fields, you need to be able to maneuver and snip at odd angles.
  • They are light. If you spend hours in the garden clipping, your hands can get tired from using the wrong, heavy garden pruners.
  • They remain sharp. Stainless steel scissors don’t rust and remain sharp even after snipping flower after flower, or stem after stem.
  • They fit perfectly in our apron. What good are garden pruner/snips if you can’t have them with you all the time. They fit perfectly in our garden apron.

Check out these great snips for yourself or a garden gift recipient and enjoy them today.

Read more about the best gardening tools and gifts here on our site or in our shop.

Best Mother's Day Garden Gifts

Gardening Gifts for Mom

A List of Great Mother’s Day Garden Gifts

If your like me, you struggle every year with finding that great, perfect gift for Mom on Mother’s Day. But have you overlooked gardening gifts for Mom as a great option? It seems that every Mom on the planet has a partial green thumb, loves flowers, or would appreciate a kind, thoughtful gift. Here is our list of winners for this year:

  • Garden Apron – if Mom loves to be outdoors, is an avid planter, or just likes to keep her clothes tidy while she is out and about in the flower or vegetable garden, this is the gift for her. This is one of the most popular items in our store, and a gift any mother would love, and is tops on our Gardening Gift for Mom list.
  • Hor Hori Garden Tool – ok, ok, most of you are saying, “A tool for Mom?”. This is no ordinary tool, and its really a Swiss Army knife in the garden. Its a trowel, weeder, pruner, saw, propagator and planter all in one. Our Hori Hori is beautiful rosewood and stainless steel, light and will be a joy for any mother as a garden gift.
  • Garden Kneeler – let’s face it, real gardener’s get down and dirty, and wet soil and dirt can ruin clothes. A garden kneeler provides a comfortable and waterproof kneeling surface for Mom as she goes about her gardening chores.
  • Dibber – The garden dibber or dibble is the most simple garden tool for Mom there is. It has been used for centuries to plant seeds and bulbs, and is a great tool for Mom to have out in the garden. A great gift for Mother’s who garden.

This is just a short and sweet list of ideas for those gardening Moms and Mothers. Check out our online store for more ideas and combinations. Happy Mother’s Day!!

Hori Hori Garden Tool Uses and Requirements

All Hori Hori Are Not The Same

A Quick Tutorial for the Hori Hori Garden Tool

Ok, we may be going a little master of the obvious here, but there are soooo many uses for the Hori Hori Japanese Garden Knife, I wanted to make sure you get the most out of the investment, and choose wisely. There are a lot of cheap tools out there that can break , rust and crack. To get all you can out of this historical Japanese gardening tool, you will need to insure you purchase one with the following features:

  • Knife Edge – a sharpened edge for cutting and pruning.
  • Serrated Edge – all Hori Hori’s should have a serrated edge for sawing through branches and roots.
  • Concave Blade – to provide digging/scooping ability, the blade should be wide and concave.
  • Measurement Marks – for planting depth reference when planting with your Hori
  • Hole in Handle – This whole comes in hand when marking planting lines with string.
  • Stainless Steel Blade – Nothing is worse than a rusting tool
Hori Hori Garden Tool and Knife
What To Look for In a Hori Hori

This is a quick list

Propagating and Growing Dahlia From Seed

Growing Dahlias from Seed

Christmas in the Spring

Last year was the first year we grew dahlias from seed and I am hooked! This method of dahlia propagation is simple, and creates a great surprise in spring. Why? Dahlia seeds are not trtue to the mother plant, so every seed is a new and unique variation. The only way to get a true replica of your mother plant is to divide the tuber, or take cuttings (Dahlia Propagation Through Cuttings article). You get such a broad and wide range of flowers, it is truly amazing, and you can keep the variations you like, dig up that dahlia tuber, and propagate for more.

The seed method is simple, and the dahlia seeds grow fast. Here is how to propagate dahlias from seed:

  1. Find a pot or seed tray and fill it with a seedling mix or a mix of soil and vermiculite.
  2. Wet the medium and pock holes with a seed planter/dibber that are about 1/2″ deep, and about an inch or so apart.
  3. Place your seeds in the holes and cover with soil mix.
  4. The seeds will germinate in about 2 weeks, but if you apply bottom heat with a seed mat, it will speed up the process (This season mine popped in 7 days).
  5. Water daily, and provide plenty of light, either with a grow light or place in a south facing window.
  6. Soon you will have a whole set of seedlings.
  7. Once they are about 2-3 inches or their leaves are touching, you can move them to small pots (3 inches) and continue to grow.
  8. Before you move the little propagated dahlias to the garden, “harden them off” by exposing them to the outdoors, gradually over a week more and more.
  9. Wait for the fun!

How to grow snapdragons

Growing Snapdragons

How to start and grow Snapdragons

Ah, the beautiful Snapdragon. We have grown them for a few seasons, and have learned a thing or two on how to produce this beautiful, constant blooming flower. We will outline how to grow Snapdragons through a tried and true method. First off, for best success, you have to start them indoors. So find a nice south facing window, or get a grow light and heat mat to get started. Here are some steps.

Growing snapdragons from seed

Growing snapdragon seedlings.

  • Sow your snapdragon seeds indoors 8-12 weeks before the last frost using seeds procured from a reputable seed provider (Johnny’s is my preferred seed provider).
  • Sow the seeds thinly and press them into the top of the soil (they need light to germinate)
  • Keep the soil moist and at around 65 degrees F
  • The seedlings will pop in one or two weeks.
  • The seedlings need plenty of light at this stage to grow, so insure a nice window setting or a grow light. Note: they need rest, so don’t leave your light on 24 hours a day. 16 hours is fine.
  • Once they have 2 set of leaves, thin them out to one plant per cell in your growing tray or pots.
  • To encourage better branching and more flowers, pinch the tops off when the seedlings reach 3-4 inches tall.
  • Feed them some fertilizer at 3-4 weeks.
  • Harden off your seedlings by slowly exposing them to the outdoors over a week.
  • Transplant the hardened-off plants to the garden after the last heavy frost. Snapdragons can tolerate light frost.

That’s it! A quick to guid to growing snapdragons, one of our favorites. Enjoy your flowers in a bed or for cutting throughout the growing season.

Lavender Farm

Our Lavender Farm

Growing Lavender

We have always wanted a large lavender field on our property, for the visual aesthetics of course, but also to provide an endless supply of the flower we love. This past fall, we dove in and prepared one of our fields for growing rows of lavender. This small lavender farm was planted with two varieties:

  • Grosso Lavender
  • Provence Lavender
Lavender Farm in Sacramento Loomis California

Lavender Farm

These varieties are the best multi-use lavender plants, and both have long, beautiful spikes and the strong lavandin scent. Initially, we plan on harvesting and drying for lavender sachets, wants and bouquets, but I really want to get into oil making. Stay tuned for more on the growth and progress by following us here or on Instagram.

Florists Apron for the Garden

5 Things Every Florist’s Apron Needs

Not Every Florist’s Apron is Created Equal

There are a lot of poor quality florist’s aprons out there in the market, and when arranging flowers in a shop or in the field, the flower trade can be demanding: dirt, water, coffee ;). A high quality apron can be a decent investment, and you want it to last, protect your clothing and most of all make your duties easy by having what you need easily accessible. Here are our requirements that every florist or flow arranger should use when shopping for that shop apron that will provide years of use, and look stylish:

  • A good florists apron material is waxed canvas. It has to be of significant weight material (they call it heavy), and treated so it shuns water.
  • Linen aprons are fun and fashionable, but soak up water and rip over time (no pocket strength).
  • There should be ample apron pocket space, and they need to be arranged well: a place for snips, scissors, tools and your phone!
  • Main pockets should be double stitched for strength and durability in the florist’s apron.
  • There should be a towel holder on the apron for a quick drying of hands or rapid cleanup.
  • Smock Straps should cross in the back to distribute the load and be comfortable.

A good apron will cost you between $30 and $50, and you get what you pay for! We offer an affordable, high quality apron that will last years and the best part is, its what we wear on the farm and while arranging!

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